Robert Burns Rights of Woman tea towel

$18.00
Robert Burns Rights of Woman tea towel

Robert Burns (1759-1796), generally considered Scotland's national poet, always sided with the common folk and was an inspiration to socialist writers in the 19th century. These words are from his poem "The Rights of Woman" written in 1792, shortly after Thomas Paine had published his "Rights of Man".

Although Paine's work might have at the time been thought to be relevant to both sexes, in practice men took all the important decisions. So both Mary Wollstonecraft in her 'Vindication of the Rights of Woman" and Burns in typically lighter strain, sought to point out the anomaly.

We have married the words of Burns with a self-portrait by his almost exact contemporary, the painter Adélaïde Labille-Guiard (1749-1803) who made her way in the male-dominated world of art both before and after the French Revolution. She campaigned for the Royal Academy of Painting and Scuplture to be opened to women and she was the first woman to be allowed to run a studio at the Louvre.

Demonstrate both your artistic and feminist credentials with this sumptuous tea towel.

Panama unbleached cotton (heavy weight, textured finish). Stitched on all four sides. Includes hanging loop. Measures approximately 19in x 27.5in. Machine wash at 110 degrees max. We recommend that before you use your tea towel for the first time you wash it at least once to soften up the material and make it more absorbent for drying dishes. Please note size can vary slightly.